Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Hats, Hats, Hats - Headwear in the Early American Republic 1780-1789

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1780 Winthrop Chandler (American artist, 1747-1790) Mrs Samuel Chandler1783 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827) The Artist's Mother, Mrs. Charles Peale1784 Joseph Wright (American artist, 1756-1793) Hannah Bloomfield Giles1785 Matthew Pratt (American artist, 1734-1805) Charity Platt Bush (1761-88)

1785 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827). Mrs. James Crawford
1785 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Mrs. John Johnston (Martha Spear)1785 Robert Edge Pine (American artist, 1730-1788) Mrs. Alexander Contee Hanson, Sr.1785-90 Beardsley Limner (American artist, fl 1785-1805) Mrs Hezekiah Beardsley1786-93 Beardsley Limner (American artist, fl 1785-1805) Harmony Child (Mrs Oliver Wright) 1765-2861

1786 Robert Edge Pine (American artist, 1730-1788) Dorcas Spear (Mrs. William Patterson)
1787 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827) Mary Chew (Mrs Thomas Elliott)1787 Christian Gullager (American artist, 1759-1826) Sarah Greenleaf (Mrs Oflin Boardman)1787 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Mrs Alexander Hamilton1787 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Mrs. James Duane1788 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827) Mrs Robert Gilmour1788 Unknown Artist Mrs Jacob Edwards

1788 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827). Peggy Sanderson (Mrs. Christopher Hughes)
1788 Unknown Artist Ruth Stanley (Mrs John Mix)1788 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Martha Tennent Rogers (Mrs. David Rogers)1789 Charles Willson Peale (American artist, 1741-1827) Mrs Robert Goldsborough1789 Christian Gullager (American artist, 1759-1826) Martha Saunders (Mrs Nicholas Salisbury)1789 Christian Gullager (American artist, 1759-1826) Elizabeth Sewall Mrs Samuel Salisbury1789 Christian Gullager (American artist, 1759-1826) Rebecca Salisbury Mrs Daniel Waldo1789 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Clarissa Seymour Mrs Truman Marsh1789 Ralph Earl (American artist, 1751-1801) Esther Boardman1789 Winthrop Chandler (American artist, 1747-1790) Mary Gleason Chandler (1752-89).

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Origin of Saying "March Comes in Like a Lion"

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1600s Woodcut Windie Winter

When I saw the woodcut of "Windie Winter" posted by Fragments this morning, I thought of the saying "March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb." It is March 1st, after all, & I wondered where it originated. Some claim that the saying applies to the relative positions of constellations at the beginning and end of the month of March. Leo, the Lion,(Eastern horizon) and Aries, the Ram or Lamb (Western horizon).

But it looks as if English playwright John Fletcher may have pointed the way toward the saying in 1624 when he wrote, "I would chuse March, for I would come in like a Lion...But you'd go out like a Lamb when you went to hanging." John Fletcher (English playwright, 1579-1625) penned this in his play A Wife for a Month, a tragicomedy (Licensed 27 May 1624; 1647) in Scene II. Act I.

A little later in the 17th century, English naturalist & writer John Ray confirmed the connection when he noted, "March hack ham [hackande = annoying] comes in like a lion, goes out like a lamb." This appears in 1670, in a book written by John Ray (English naturalist, 1627-1705), the Catalogue of English Proverbs. p 41.

In the British American colonies, the phrase "March came in like a lion" shows up in Ames Almanack in 1740, and in William Byrd's Another Secret Diary in the same year. John Adams notes in his Diary in 1788, "The month (March) comes in like and lion, and according to the farmer's proverb it must go out like a lamb."


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